[][src]Struct sequoia_openpgp::cert::prelude::Cert

pub struct Cert { /* fields omitted */ }

A collection of components and their associated signatures.

The Cert data structure mirrors the TPK and TSK data structures defined in RFC 4880. Specifically, it contains components (Keys, UserIDs, and UserAttributes), their associated self signatures, self revocations, third-party signatures, and third-party revocations, use useful methods.

Certs are canonicalized in the sense that their Components are deduplicated, and their signatures and revocations are deduplicated and checked for validity. The canonicalization routine does not throw away components that have no self signatures. These are returned as usual by, e.g., Cert::userids.

Keys are deduplicated by comparing their public bits using Key::public_cmp. If two keys are considered equal, and only one of them has secret key material, the key with the secret key material is preferred. If both keys have secret material, then one of them is chosen in a deterministic, but undefined manner, which is subject to change. Note: the secret key material is not integrity checked. Hence when updating a certificate with secret key material, it is essential to first strip the secret key material from copies that came from an untrusted source.

Signatures are deduplicated using their Eq implementation, which compares the data that is hashed and the MPIs. That is, it does not compare the unhashed data, the digest prefix and the unhashed subpacket area. If two signatures are considered equal, but have different unhashed data, the unhashed data are merged in a deterministic, but undefined manner, which is subject to change. This policy prevents an attacker from flooding a certificate with valid signatures that only differ in their unhashed data.

Self signatures and self revocations are checked for validity by making sure that the signature is mathematically correct. At this point, the signature is not checked against a Policy.

Third-party signatures and revocations are checked for validity by making sure the computed digest matches the digest prefix stored in the signature packet. This is not an integrity check and is easily spoofed. Unfortunately, at the time of canonicalization, the actual signatures cannot be checked, because the public keys are not available. If you rely on these signatures, it is up to you to check their validity by using an appropriate signature verification method, e.g., Signature::verify_userid_binding or Signature::verify_userid_revocation.

If a signature or a revocation is not valid, we check to see whether it is simply out of place (i.e., belongs to a different component) and, if so, we reorder it. If not, it is added to a list of bad signatures. These can be retrieved using Cert::bad_signatures.

Signatures and revocations are sorted so that the newest signature comes first. Components are sorted, but in an undefined manner (i.e., when parsing the same certificate multiple times, the components will be in the same order, but we reserve the right to change the sort function between versions).

Secret Keys

Any key in a certificate may include secret key material. To protect secret key material from being leaked, secret keys are not written out when a Cert is serialized. To also serialize secret key material, you need to serialize the object returned by Cert::as_tsk().

Secret key material may be protected with a password. In such cases, it needs to be decrypted before it can be used to decrypt data or generate a signature. Refer to Key::decrypt_secret for details.

Filtering Certificates

To filter certificates, iterate over all components, clone what you want to keep, and then reassemble the certificate. The following example simply copies all the packets, and can be adapted to suit your policy:

use std::convert::TryFrom;
use openpgp::cert::prelude::*;

fn identity_filter(cert: &Cert) -> Result<Cert> {
    // Iterate over all of the Cert components, pushing packets we
    // want to keep into the accumulator.
    let mut acc = Vec::new();

    // Primary key and related signatures.
    let c = cert.primary_key();
    acc.push(c.key().clone().into());
    for s in c.self_signatures()   { acc.push(s.clone().into()) }
    for s in c.certifications()    { acc.push(s.clone().into()) }
    for s in c.self_revocations()  { acc.push(s.clone().into()) }
    for s in c.other_revocations() { acc.push(s.clone().into()) }

    // UserIDs and related signatures.
    for c in cert.userids() {
        acc.push(c.userid().clone().into());
        for s in c.self_signatures()   { acc.push(s.clone().into()) }
        for s in c.certifications()    { acc.push(s.clone().into()) }
        for s in c.self_revocations()  { acc.push(s.clone().into()) }
        for s in c.other_revocations() { acc.push(s.clone().into()) }
    }

    // UserAttributes and related signatures.
    for c in cert.user_attributes() {
        acc.push(c.user_attribute().clone().into());
        for s in c.self_signatures()   { acc.push(s.clone().into()) }
        for s in c.certifications()    { acc.push(s.clone().into()) }
        for s in c.self_revocations()  { acc.push(s.clone().into()) }
        for s in c.other_revocations() { acc.push(s.clone().into()) }
    }

    // Subkeys and related signatures.
    for c in cert.keys().subkeys() {
        acc.push(c.key().clone().into());
        for s in c.self_signatures()   { acc.push(s.clone().into()) }
        for s in c.certifications()    { acc.push(s.clone().into()) }
        for s in c.self_revocations()  { acc.push(s.clone().into()) }
        for s in c.other_revocations() { acc.push(s.clone().into()) }
    }

    // Unknown components and related signatures.
    for c in cert.unknowns() {
        acc.push(c.unknown().clone().into());
        for s in c.self_signatures()   { acc.push(s.clone().into()) }
        for s in c.certifications()    { acc.push(s.clone().into()) }
        for s in c.self_revocations()  { acc.push(s.clone().into()) }
        for s in c.other_revocations() { acc.push(s.clone().into()) }
    }

    // Any signatures that we could not associate with a component.
    for s in cert.bad_signatures()     { acc.push(s.clone().into()) }

    // Finally, parse into Cert.
    Cert::try_from(acc)
}

let (cert, _) =
    CertBuilder::general_purpose(None, Some("alice@example.org"))
    .generate()?;
assert_eq!(cert, identity_filter(&cert)?);

Examples

Parse a certificate:

use std::convert::TryFrom;
use sequoia_openpgp as openpgp;
use openpgp::Cert;

match Cert::try_from(ppr) {
    Ok(cert) => {
        println!("Key: {}", cert.fingerprint());
        for uid in cert.userids() {
            println!("User ID: {}", uid.userid());
        }
    }
    Err(err) => {
        eprintln!("Error parsing Cert: {}", err);
    }
}

Methods

impl Cert[src]

pub fn primary_key(&self) -> PrimaryKeyAmalgamation<PublicParts>[src]

Returns the primary key.

Unlike getting the certificate's primary key using the Cert::keys method, this method does not erase the key's role.

A key's secret key material may be protected with a password. In such cases, it needs to be decrypted before it can be used to decrypt data or generate a signature. Refer to Key::decrypt_secret for details.

Examples

The first key returned by Cert::keys is the primary key, but its role has been erased:

assert_eq!(cert.primary_key().key().role_as_unspecified(),
           cert.keys().nth(0).unwrap().key());

pub fn revocation_status<T>(
    &self,
    policy: &dyn Policy,
    t: T
) -> RevocationStatus where
    T: Into<Option<SystemTime>>, 
[src]

Returns the certificate's revocation status.

Normally, methods that take a policy and a reference time are only provided by ValidCert. This method is provided here because there are two revocation criteria, and one of them is independent of the reference time. That is, even if it is not possible to turn a Cert into a ValidCert at time t, it may still be considered revoked at time t.

A certificate is considered revoked at time t if:

  • There is a valid and live revocation at time t that is newer than all valid and live self signatures at time t, or

  • There is a valid hard revocation (even if it is not live at time t, and even if there is a newer self signature).

Note: certificates and subkeys have different revocation criteria from User IDs and User Attributes.

Examples

use sequoia_openpgp as openpgp;
use openpgp::cert::prelude::*;
use openpgp::types::RevocationStatus;
use openpgp::policy::StandardPolicy;

let p = &StandardPolicy::new();

let (cert, rev) =
    CertBuilder::general_purpose(None, Some("alice@example.org"))
    .generate()?;

assert_eq!(cert.revocation_status(p, None), RevocationStatus::NotAsFarAsWeKnow);

// Merge the revocation certificate.  `cert` is now considered
// to be revoked.
let cert = cert.merge_packets(rev.clone())?;
assert_eq!(cert.revocation_status(p, None),
           RevocationStatus::Revoked(vec![ &rev.into() ]));

pub fn revoke(
    &self,
    primary_signer: &mut dyn Signer,
    code: ReasonForRevocation,
    reason: &[u8]
) -> Result<Signature>
[src]

Revokes the certificate in place.

This is a convenience function around CertRevocationBuilder to generate a revocation certificate.

If you want to revoke an individual component, use SubkeyRevocationBuilder, UserIDRevocationBuilder, or UserAttributeRevocationBuilder, as appropriate.

Examples

use sequoia_openpgp as openpgp;
use openpgp::types::{ReasonForRevocation, RevocationStatus, SignatureType};
use openpgp::cert::prelude::*;
use openpgp::crypto::KeyPair;
use openpgp::parse::Parse;
use openpgp::policy::StandardPolicy;

let p = &StandardPolicy::new();

let (cert, rev) = CertBuilder::new()
    .set_cipher_suite(CipherSuite::Cv25519)
    .generate()?;

// A new certificate is not revoked.
assert_eq!(cert.revocation_status(p, None),
           RevocationStatus::NotAsFarAsWeKnow);

// The default revocation certificate is a generic
// revocation.
assert_eq!(rev.reason_for_revocation().unwrap().0,
           ReasonForRevocation::Unspecified);

// Create a revocation to explain what *really* happened.
let mut keypair = cert.primary_key()
    .key().clone().parts_into_secret()?.into_keypair()?;
let rev = cert.revoke(&mut keypair,
                      ReasonForRevocation::KeyCompromised,
                      b"It was the maid :/")?;
let cert = cert.merge_packets(rev)?;
if let RevocationStatus::Revoked(revs) = cert.revocation_status(p, None) {
    assert_eq!(revs.len(), 1);
    let rev = revs[0];

    assert_eq!(rev.typ(), SignatureType::KeyRevocation);
    assert_eq!(rev.reason_for_revocation(),
               Some((ReasonForRevocation::KeyCompromised,
                     "It was the maid :/".as_bytes())));
} else {
    unreachable!()
}

pub fn set_expiration_time<T>(
    &self,
    policy: &dyn Policy,
    t: T,
    primary_signer: &mut dyn Signer,
    expiration: Option<SystemTime>
) -> Result<Vec<Signature>> where
    T: Into<Option<SystemTime>>, 
[src]

Sets the certificate to expire at the specified time.

If no time (None) is specified, then the certificate is set to not expire.

This function creates new binding signatures that cause the certificate to expire at the specified time. Specifically, it updates the current binding signature on each of the valid, non-revoked User IDs, and the direct key signature, if any. This is necessary, because the primary User ID is first consulted when determining the certificate's expiration time, and certificates can be distributed with a possibly empty subset of User IDs.

A policy is needed, because the expiration is updated by updating the current binding signatures.

Examples

use std::time;
use sequoia_openpgp as openpgp;
use openpgp::cert::prelude::*;
use openpgp::crypto::KeyPair;
use openpgp::policy::StandardPolicy;

let p = &StandardPolicy::new();

// The certificate is alive (not expired).
assert!(cert.with_policy(p, None)?.alive().is_ok());

// Make cert expire now.
let mut keypair = cert.primary_key()
    .key().clone().parts_into_secret()?.into_keypair()?;
let sigs = cert.set_expiration_time(p, None, &mut keypair,
                                    Some(time::SystemTime::now()))?;

let cert = cert.merge_packets(sigs)?;
assert!(cert.with_policy(p, None)?.alive().is_err());

pub fn userids(&self) -> UserIDAmalgamationIter[src]

Returns an iterator over the certificate's User IDs.

This returns all User IDs, even those without a binding signature.

Examples

use sequoia_openpgp as openpgp;

println!("{}'s User IDs:", cert.fingerprint());
for ua in cert.userids() {
    println!("  {}", String::from_utf8_lossy(ua.value()));
}

pub fn user_attributes(&self) -> UserAttributeAmalgamationIter[src]

Returns an iterator over the certificate's User Attributes.

This returns all User Attributes, even those without a binding signature.

Examples

use sequoia_openpgp as openpgp;

println!("{}'s has {} User Attributes.",
         cert.fingerprint(),
         cert.user_attributes().count());

pub fn keys(&self) -> KeyAmalgamationIter<PublicParts, UnspecifiedRole>[src]

Returns an iterator over the certificate's keys.

That is, this returns an iterator over the primary key and any subkeys. It returns all keys, even those without a binding signature.

By necessity, this function erases the returned keys' roles. If you are only interested in the primary key, use Cert::primary_key. If you are only interested in the subkeys, use KeyAmalgamationIter::subkeys. These functions preserve the keys' role in the type system.

A key's secret secret key material may be protected with a password. In such cases, it needs to be decrypted before it can be used to decrypt data or generate a signature. Refer to Key::decrypt_secret for details.

Examples

use sequoia_openpgp as openpgp;

println!("{}'s has {} keys.",
         cert.fingerprint(),
         cert.keys().count());

pub fn unknowns(&self) -> UnknownComponentAmalgamationIter[src]

Returns an iterator over the certificate's unknown components.

This function returns all unknown components even those without a binding signature.

Examples

use sequoia_openpgp as openpgp;

println!("{}'s has {} unknown components.",
         cert.fingerprint(),
         cert.unknowns().count());
for ua in cert.unknowns() {
    println!("  Unknown component with tag {} ({}), error: {}",
             ua.tag(), u8::from(ua.tag()), ua.error());
}

pub fn bad_signatures(&self) -> &[Signature][src]

Returns a slice containing the bad signatures.

Bad signatures are signatures and revocations that we could not associate with one of the certificate's components.

For self signatures and self revocations, we check that the signature is correct. For third-party signatures and third-party revocations, we only check that the digest prefix is correct, because third-party keys are not available. Checking the digest prefix is not an integrity check; third party-signatures and third-party revocations may be invalid and must still be checked for validity before use.

Examples

use sequoia_openpgp as openpgp;

println!("{}'s has {} bad signatures.",
         cert.fingerprint(),
         cert.bad_signatures().len());

pub fn revocation_keys<'a>(
    &'a self,
    policy: &dyn Policy
) -> Box<dyn Iterator<Item = &'a RevocationKey> + 'a>
[src]

Returns a list of any designated revokers for this certificate.

This function returns the designated revokers listed on the primary key's binding signatures and the certificate's direct key signatures.

Note: the returned list is deduplicated.

Examples

use sequoia_openpgp as openpgp;
use openpgp::cert::prelude::*;
use openpgp::policy::StandardPolicy;
use openpgp::types::RevocationKey;

let p = &StandardPolicy::new();

let (alice, _) =
    CertBuilder::general_purpose(None, Some("alice@example.org"))
    .generate()?;
// Make Alice a designated revoker for Bob.
let (bob, _) =
    CertBuilder::general_purpose(None, Some("bob@example.org"))
    .set_revocation_keys(vec![ (&alice).into() ])
    .generate()?;

// Make sure Alice is listed as a designated revoker for Bob.
assert_eq!(bob.revocation_keys(p).collect::<Vec<&RevocationKey>>(),
           vec![ &(&alice).into() ]);

pub fn into_packets(self) -> impl Iterator<Item = Packet>[src]

Converts the certificate into an iterator over a sequence of packets.

Examples

use sequoia_openpgp as openpgp;

println!("Cert contains {} packets",
         cert.into_packets().count());

pub fn from_packets(p: impl Iterator<Item = Packet>) -> Result<Self>[src]

Returns the first certificate found in the sequence of packets.

If the sequence of packets does not start with a certificate (specifically, if it does not start with a primary key packet), then this fails.

If the sequence contains multiple keys (i.e., it is a keyring) and you want all of the certificates, you should use CertParser instead of this function.

This function does not fail if the certificate is followed by an invalid packet. In that case, the certificate is returned and the packets starting with the first invalid packet are ignored. If you want to make sure that the sequence of packets contains exactly one certificate and no invalid packets, use CertParser instead of this function.

Examples

use sequoia_openpgp as openpgp;
use openpgp::cert::prelude::*;
use openpgp::packet::prelude::*;
use openpgp::PacketPile;

let (cert, rev) =
    CertBuilder::general_purpose(None, Some("alice@example.org"))
    .generate()?;

// We should be able to turn a certificate into a PacketPile
// and back.
assert!(Cert::from_packets(cert.into_packets()).is_ok());

// But a revocation certificate is not a certificate, so this
// will fail.
let p : Vec<Packet> = vec![ rev.into() ];
assert!(Cert::from_packets(p.into_iter()).is_err());

pub fn into_packet_pile(self) -> PacketPile[src]

Converts the certificate into a PacketPile.

Examples

use sequoia_openpgp as openpgp;

let pp = cert.into_packet_pile();

pub fn key_handle(&self) -> KeyHandle[src]

Returns the certificate's fingerprint as a KeyHandle.

Examples

use sequoia_openpgp as openpgp;

println!("{}", cert.key_handle());

// This always returns a fingerprint.
match cert.key_handle() {
    KeyHandle::Fingerprint(_) => (),
    KeyHandle::KeyID(_) => unreachable!(),
}

pub fn fingerprint(&self) -> Fingerprint[src]

Returns the certificate's fingerprint.

Examples

use sequoia_openpgp as openpgp;

println!("{}", cert.fingerprint());

pub fn keyid(&self) -> KeyID[src]

Returns the certificate's Key ID.

As a general rule of thumb, you should prefer the fingerprint as it is possible to create keys with a colliding Key ID using a birthday attack.

Examples

use sequoia_openpgp as openpgp;

println!("{}", cert.keyid());

pub fn merge(self, other: Cert) -> Result<Self>[src]

Merges other into self.

If other is a different certificate, then an error is returned.

This routine merges duplicate packets. This is different from Cert::merge_packets, which prefers keys in the packets that are being merged into the certificate.

Examples

use sequoia_openpgp as openpgp;

// Merge the "local" version with the version from the "key server".
let cert = if local.fingerprint() == keyserver.fingerprint() {
    local.merge(keyserver)?;
} else {
    // Error, the key server returned a different certificate.
};

pub fn merge_packets<I>(self, packets: I) -> Result<Self> where
    I: IntoIterator,
    I::Item: Into<Packet>, 
[src]

Adds packets to the certificate.

This function turns the certificate into a sequence of packets, appends the packets to the end of it, and canonicalizes the result. Known packets that don't belong in a TPK or TSK cause this function to return an error. Unknown packets are retained and added to the list of unknown components. The goal is to provide some future compatibility.

If a key is merged that already exists in the certificate, it replaces the existing key. This way, secret key material can be added, removed, encrypted, or decrypted.

Examples

use sequoia_openpgp as openpgp;
use openpgp::cert::prelude::*;
use openpgp::packet::prelude::*;
use openpgp::serialize::Serialize;
use openpgp::parse::Parse;
use openpgp::types::DataFormat;

// Create a new key.
let (cert, rev) =
      CertBuilder::general_purpose(None, Some("alice@example.org"))
      .generate()?;
assert!(cert.is_tsk());


// Merge in the revocation certificate.
assert_eq!(cert.primary_key().self_revocations().len(), 0);
let cert = cert.merge_packets(rev)?;
assert_eq!(cert.primary_key().self_revocations().len(), 1);


// Add an unknown packet.
let tag = Tag::Private(61.into());
let unknown = Unknown::new(tag,
    openpgp::Error::UnsupportedPacketType(tag).into());

// It shows up as an unknown component.
let cert = cert.merge_packets(unknown)?;
assert_eq!(cert.unknowns().count(), 1);
for p in cert.unknowns() {
    assert_eq!(p.tag(), tag);
}


// Try and merge a literal data packet.
let mut lit = Literal::new(DataFormat::Text);
lit.set_body(b"test".to_vec());

// Merging packets that are known to not belong to a
// certificate result in an error.
assert!(cert.merge_packets(lit).is_err());

Remove secret key material:

use sequoia_openpgp as openpgp;
use openpgp::cert::prelude::*;
use openpgp::packet::prelude::*;

// Create a new key.
let (cert, _) =
      CertBuilder::general_purpose(None, Some("alice@example.org"))
      .generate()?;
assert!(cert.is_tsk());

// We just created the key, so all of the keys have secret key
// material.
let mut pk = cert.primary_key().key().clone();

// Split off the secret key material.
let (pk, sk) = pk.take_secret();
assert!(sk.is_some());
assert!(! pk.has_secret());

// Merge in the public key.  Recall: the packets that are
// being merged into the certificate take precedence.
let cert = cert.merge_packets(pk)?;

// The secret key material is stripped.
assert!(! cert.primary_key().has_secret());

pub fn is_tsk(&self) -> bool[src]

Returns whether at least one of the keys includes secret key material.

This returns true if either the primary key or at least one of the subkeys includes secret key material.

Examples

use sequoia_openpgp as openpgp;
use openpgp::cert::prelude::*;
use openpgp::policy::StandardPolicy;
use openpgp::serialize::Serialize;
use openpgp::parse::Parse;

let p = &StandardPolicy::new();

// Create a new key.
let (cert, _) =
      CertBuilder::general_purpose(None, Some("alice@example.org"))
      .generate()?;
assert!(cert.is_tsk());

// If we serialize the certificate, the secret key material is
// stripped, unless we first convert it to a TSK.

let mut buffer = Vec::new();
cert.as_tsk().serialize(&mut buffer);
let cert = Cert::from_bytes(&buffer)?;
assert!(cert.is_tsk());

// Now round trip it without first converting it to a TSK.  This
// drops the secret key material.
let mut buffer = Vec::new();
cert.serialize(&mut buffer);
let cert = Cert::from_bytes(&buffer)?;
assert!(!cert.is_tsk());

pub fn strip_secret_key_material(self) -> Cert[src]

Strips any secret key material.

Examples

use sequoia_openpgp as openpgp;
use openpgp::cert::prelude::*;


// Create a new key.
let (cert, _) =
      CertBuilder::general_purpose(None, Some("alice@example.org"))
      .generate()?;
assert!(cert.is_tsk());

let cert = cert.strip_secret_key_material();
assert!(! cert.is_tsk());

pub fn with_policy<'a, T>(
    &'a self,
    policy: &'a dyn Policy,
    time: T
) -> Result<ValidCert<'a>> where
    T: Into<Option<SystemTime>>, 
[src]

Associates a policy and a reference time with the certificate.

This is used to turn a Cert into a ValidCert. (See also ValidateAmalgamation, which does the same for component amalgamations.)

A certificate is considered valid if:

  • It has a self signature that is live at time t.

  • The policy considers it acceptable.

This doesn't say anything about whether the certificate itself is alive (see ValidCert::alive) or revoked (see ValidCert::revoked).

Examples

use sequoia_openpgp as openpgp;
use openpgp::policy::StandardPolicy;

let p = &StandardPolicy::new();

let vc = cert.with_policy(p, None)?;

impl Cert[src]

pub fn as_tsk<'a>(&'a self) -> TSK<'a>[src]

Derive a TSK object from this key.

This object writes out secret keys during serialization.

impl Cert[src]

pub fn armor_headers(&self) -> Vec<String>[src]

Creates descriptive armor headers.

Returns armor headers that describe this Cert. The Cert's primary fingerprint and valid userids (according to the default policy) are included as comments, so that it is easier to identify the Cert when looking at the armored data.

pub fn armored<'a>(&'a self) -> impl Serialize + SerializeInto + 'a[src]

Wraps this Cert in an armor structure when serialized.

Derives an object from this Cert that adds an armor structure to the serialized Cert when it is serialized. Additionally, the Cert's userids are added as comments, so that it is easier to identify the Cert when looking at the armored data.

Example

use sequoia_openpgp as openpgp;
use openpgp::cert::prelude::*;
use openpgp::serialize::SerializeInto;

let (cert, _) =
    CertBuilder::general_purpose(None, Some("Mr. Pink ☮☮☮"))
    .generate()?;
let armored = String::from_utf8(cert.armored().to_vec()?)?;

assert!(armored.starts_with("-----BEGIN PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----"));
assert!(armored.contains("Mr. Pink ☮☮☮"));

Trait Implementations

impl<'a> Parse<'a, Cert> for Cert[src]

fn from_reader<R: Read>(reader: R) -> Result<Self>[src]

Returns the first Cert encountered in the reader.

fn from_file<P: AsRef<Path>>(path: P) -> Result<Self>[src]

Returns the first Cert encountered in the file.

fn from_bytes<D: AsRef<[u8]> + ?Sized>(data: &'a D) -> Result<Self>[src]

Returns the first Cert found in buf.

buf must be an OpenPGP-encoded message.

impl Serialize for Cert[src]

fn serialize(&self, o: &mut dyn Write) -> Result<()>[src]

Writes a serialized version of the object to o.

fn export(&self, o: &mut dyn Write) -> Result<()>[src]

Exports a serialized version of the object to o. Read more

impl Marshal for Cert[src]

impl SerializeInto for Cert[src]

fn serialized_len(&self) -> usize[src]

Computes the maximal length of the serialized representation. Read more

fn serialize_into(&self, buf: &mut [u8]) -> Result<usize>[src]

Serializes into the given buffer. Read more

fn to_vec(&self) -> Result<Vec<u8>>[src]

Serializes the packet to a vector.

fn export_into(&self, buf: &mut [u8]) -> Result<usize>[src]

Exports into the given buffer. Read more

fn export_to_vec(&self) -> Result<Vec<u8>>[src]

Exports to a vector. Read more

impl MarshalInto for Cert[src]

fn to_vec(&self) -> Result<Vec<u8>>[src]

Serializes the packet to a vector.

fn export_to_vec(&self) -> Result<Vec<u8>>[src]

Exports to a vector. Read more

impl From<Cert> for Vec<Packet>[src]

impl From<Cert> for PacketPile[src]

fn from(cert: Cert) -> PacketPile[src]

Converts the Cert into a PacketPile.

impl<'_> From<&'_ Cert> for RevocationKey[src]

impl IntoIterator for Cert[src]

type Item = Packet

The type of the elements being iterated over.

type IntoIter = IntoIter

Which kind of iterator are we turning this into?

impl PartialEq<Cert> for Cert[src]

impl Clone for Cert[src]

fn clone_from(&mut self, source: &Self)
1.0.0
[src]

Performs copy-assignment from source. Read more

impl Display for Cert[src]

impl Debug for Cert[src]

impl<'_> TryFrom<PacketParserResult<'_>> for Cert[src]

type Error = Error

The type returned in the event of a conversion error.

fn try_from(ppr: PacketParserResult) -> Result<Self>[src]

Returns the Cert found in the packet stream.

If there are more packets after the Cert, e.g. because the packet stream is a keyring, this function will return Error::MalformedCert.

impl TryFrom<Vec<Packet>> for Cert[src]

type Error = Error

The type returned in the event of a conversion error.

impl TryFrom<Packet> for Cert[src]

type Error = Error

The type returned in the event of a conversion error.

impl TryFrom<PacketPile> for Cert[src]

type Error = Error

The type returned in the event of a conversion error.

fn try_from(p: PacketPile) -> Result<Self>[src]

Returns the first certificate found in the PacketPile.

If the PacketPile does not start with a certificate (specifically, if it does not start with a primary key packet), then this fails.

If the PacketPile contains multiple keys (i.e., it is a key ring) and you want all of the certificates, you should use CertParser instead of this function.

Examples

use sequoia_openpgp as openpgp;
use openpgp::cert::prelude::*;
use openpgp::packet::prelude::*;
use openpgp::PacketPile;
use std::convert::TryFrom;

let (cert, rev) =
    CertBuilder::general_purpose(None, Some("alice@example.org"))
    .generate()?;

// We should be able to turn a certificate into a PacketPile
// and back.
let pp : PacketPile = cert.into();
assert!(Cert::try_from(pp).is_ok());

// But a revocation certificate is not a certificate, so this
// will fail.
let pp : PacketPile = Packet::from(rev).into();
assert!(Cert::try_from(pp).is_err());

impl FromStr for Cert[src]

type Err = Error

The associated error which can be returned from parsing.

Auto Trait Implementations

impl Send for Cert

impl Sync for Cert

Blanket Implementations

impl<T> From for T[src]

impl<I> IntoIterator for I where
    I: Iterator
[src]

type Item = <I as Iterator>::Item

The type of the elements being iterated over.

type IntoIter = I

Which kind of iterator are we turning this into?

impl<T, U> Into for T where
    U: From<T>, 
[src]

impl<T> ToOwned for T where
    T: Clone
[src]

type Owned = T

impl<T> ToString for T where
    T: Display + ?Sized
[src]

impl<T, U> TryFrom for T where
    U: Into<T>, 
[src]

type Error = Infallible

The type returned in the event of a conversion error.

impl<T> Borrow for T where
    T: ?Sized
[src]

impl<T> BorrowMut for T where
    T: ?Sized
[src]

impl<T> Any for T where
    T: 'static + ?Sized
[src]

impl<T, U> TryInto for T where
    U: TryFrom<T>, 
[src]

type Error = <U as TryFrom<T>>::Error

The type returned in the event of a conversion error.

impl<T> DynClone for T where
    T: Clone
[src]